Knitted Eira jacket/ Eirajakke

Knitted Eira jacket/ Eirajakke

I know that this is a sewing blog, but today I have a knitted garment to show you. My Eira jacket or Eirajakke as it’s called in Norwegian. The reason I’m showing you the sweater, is because I get a lot of questions about it. If you watched “Det Store Symesterskapet” on NRK1 this autumn you will have seen it, as I wore it in several of the episodes. (For those of you not familiar with Det Store Symesterskapet: It’s the Norwegian version of the BBC show “The great British sewing bee”.) The cardigan is actually the first (and only) sweater with a multi colour pattern I have made for myself. Favourite cardigan I have an old knitted cardigan in my closet, that I got when an old aunt died some years ago. I absolutely loved that cardigan, and literally wore it to bits. I had to find a replacement. Eirajakke & Pickles yarn When I came across the Eirajakke in a booklet from Nostebarn, I decided that this was the pattern I had been looking for. Nostebarn also sells yarn, and it would have been natural to buy the yarn needed from them. But no. I wanted a certain look for my cardigan, and had already blinked out Pickles Merino Tweed, a tweed yarn from Pickles.no. I can’t say that the yarn was a joy to knit with, not by a long shot, but I liked the texture on the finished result. I’m to the fastest of knitters, and it took me maybe a couple of months to finish[…]

Mustard Jenna Cardi

Mustard Jenna Cardi

Hi. Here in Norway the winter has come for sure. Just look at the weather outside my window as I type this. Winter for me means wool. I will wear nothing but wool during the winter season if I can. Today I have a wool cardigan to show you. The pattern: Jenna Cardi from Muse patterns.   Customizing the Jenna Cardi pattern I have made this pattern twice. The second jacket, which is the one I will show you today, is the hip length version with long sleeves (variation A, bottom). To make the cardigan a little less plain I decided to make it with pleated sleeve heads. I searched a while in my patten books and found out how to do it in Metric pattern cutting for women’s wear by Winifred Aldrich. Here is what I did: First I made an horizontal line across the sleeve head above the marks. I then cut the top of the sleeve head into four sections and pulled them up and away from each other. I drew in the new outer line and marked the gaps on the pattern piece. I must admit I forgot about the fact that the pattern already had the seam allowance counted in, so I didn’t make the gaps as big as they should have been. Still, I got some of the effect I was after, and so I’m happy.   I also did my usual pattern changes: lengthening the upper body with 4 cm, and adjusted shoulder seams for forward tilting shoulders.[…]