Report from the Norwegian knitting festival in Fredrikstad

Report from the Norwegian knitting festival in Fredrikstad

Report from the Norwegian knitting festival in Fredrikstad, where I attended a course in dyeing yarn with Indigo. Progress on my #oneyearoneoutfit.

Favourite trousers 2.0, doing wool

Favourite trousers 2.0, doing wool

And here it is. The first blog post in 2016, but focusing on a make from December 2015. Last year was all about selfish sewing for me. The year before that too, come to think of it. Today I want to show you my second try at the pattern made from my RTW trousers that I blogged about back in November. Favourite trousers 2.0 This time I used a dark blue wool twill, that has been in my stash for more than a year. I think I bought it on sale at Rainbow Tekstil in Oslo sometime before last winter. I have already told you about how the pattern came to be here, but I can tell you what changes I did this time around. First of all I needed more space at the waist. If you remember the fly was less than elegantly sewn the last time, showing the zipper teeth at the top. So before sewing up the pattern once again I added a few cm at the waistband and waist  to make sure I had enough space to cover the zipper properly. I also made the rise a little longer at the thigh to eliminate the pulling around the crotch. Even if it worked a bit, I think I will have to add another cm before I’m completely happy with the fit in this area. apparently I have big inner thighs. I also managed to get the grainline on the front pieces level this time, and the centre press line doesn’t twist[…]

Homeboy hoodie for my hubby

Homeboy hoodie for my hubby

Again I have made a garment for my husband, my biggest sewing fan and forever in need of soft and nice wool garments he knows I can make him. Today I want you to meet the navy blue  wool Homeboy Hoodie.. This is not the first time I have made a hoodie, but the first I have made one for my husband. If you followed the Symesterskapet on NRK last year you will have seen me making this beauty in the first episode: Compared to that, this hoodie was a joy to sew. It was fast and easy, and I needed to do just one minimal change. But first things first. Let’s start with the pattern. Homeboy Hoodie After seeing the hoodie Joost made on Instragram I decided to try his pattern. He runs the site MakeMyPattern, which generate patterns for you based on the measurements you type in. He is also generously offering up his patterns for free, but accepts donations to his site. The pattern I used is the Homeboy Hoodie, the first pattern of his that I have tried. I followed the instructions and punched in my husbands measurements, and the pattern was generated as a pdf I could print. Even with failing ink in my printer I got the pattern together fairly quickly, as there isn’t that many pattern pieces. I must also say that I like the way the pattern pieces are marked. A wool fabric.. The fabric I chose for this project is an unbrushed college fabric in 100%[…]

Newsboy cap / sixpence for my husband

Newsboy cap / sixpence for my husband

Hello there. This time I’m going to show you some sewing I did for my husband recently. A newsboy cap in wool and cashmere tweed. I wanted to sew something for my husband in between all the wedding dress sewing, as he needed a pick-me-up here the other day. I knew that a sixpence was on his wishlist – together with a new pair of trousers and some other stuff. This cap is a easy 1-2 hour project, and super for a bit of quick-fix sewing. The newsboy cap pattern I picked up the pattern af Craftsy. It’s a free pattern, and you can find it here. (If you haven’t heard of Craftsy you should go and take a look. I haven’t tried any of their online classes yet, but I have picked up the odd pattern there.) The newsboy cap pattern consist of a top part, a side/front part and a brim. The instructions are easy to understand and with illustrations of most of the steps. And as I said, its free. I made a few changes to the pattern though.  I made the width a bit smaller from approx. middle of the sides and to the front on both the top and side piece, as both my husband and I thought that the whole cap was a little too wide. The brim was also made a bit shorter to give it the shape my husband wanted. In the photo above you can see the shape of the brim is different on the pattern piece lying next to it. That[…]

Easy knit pencil skirt

Easy knit pencil skirt

I know I’m a little later than usual with this blogpost. The reason was that I went on a trip to Copenhagen together with a whole bunch of sewing enthusiast this last weekend. The goal for the trip: The “Alt om Håndarbeide messe” (Arts & Crafts fair) they were holding. But more on that in a later blogpost. Today I want to show you my yellow pencil skirt, as seen together with the Eirajakke in my last posting. The Easy knit pencil skirt pattern: The skirt pattern is the elastic skirt from the book “Gertie sews vintage casual”. It’s called Easy Knit Pencil Skirt. Because my fabric was a plain boiled wool fabric I decided to do something about the model to make it a little more exciting. I cut the front pattern piece in two lengthwise, and made panel seams along the front. In the back I made a kick pleat similar to the one on the Mabel skirt from Colette Patterns. Other than that I just made a slight adjustment at top of center back seam, as I have a sway back. Assembly of the skirt I overlocked/serged all the seams, and then did a elastic topstitch seam on the panel seams and center back seam on my regular sewing machine. Even if these topstitch seams are vertical, I thought it was best to make the seams elastic. I have more than once had to go back and fix seams on garments I have sewn because I didn’t make them elastic enough the first time around. Breaking seams are[…]

Mustard Jenna Cardi

Mustard Jenna Cardi

Hi. Here in Norway the winter has come for sure. Just look at the weather outside my window as I type this. Winter for me means wool. I will wear nothing but wool during the winter season if I can. Today I have a wool cardigan to show you. The pattern: Jenna Cardi from Muse patterns.   Customizing the Jenna Cardi pattern I have made this pattern twice. The second jacket, which is the one I will show you today, is the hip length version with long sleeves (variation A, bottom). To make the cardigan a little less plain I decided to make it with pleated sleeve heads. I searched a while in my patten books and found out how to do it in Metric pattern cutting for women’s wear by Winifred Aldrich. Here is what I did: First I made an horizontal line across the sleeve head above the marks. I then cut the top of the sleeve head into four sections and pulled them up and away from each other. I drew in the new outer line and marked the gaps on the pattern piece. I must admit I forgot about the fact that the pattern already had the seam allowance counted in, so I didn’t make the gaps as big as they should have been. Still, I got some of the effect I was after, and so I’m happy.   I also did my usual pattern changes: lengthening the upper body with 4 cm, and adjusted shoulder seams for forward tilting shoulders.[…]