Lace Camas blouse

Lace Camas blouse

After participating in the Camas Sew-along on the Thread Theory blog, I knew I had blog about the finished blouse right away. I have several other garments all ready to be photographed and blogged, but this had to come first.

Making a Camas Blouse

I’ve had the Camas pattern in my pattern collection for a while. I bought it not long after it was published in their web shop, and as I’m not too fond of pdf’s (especially the taping of the numerous pages) I bought the printed version. I’m a regular reader of the Thread Theory blog and got really inspired when I discovered they were doing a sew-along on the blouse.

After rummaging around in my stash for a suitable muslin fabric I came across a small piece of white viscose left after my cartoon dress. I figured it would be just about enough fabric for a muslin for the blouse.

Camas blouse

Lace panel in back

The pattern changes.

I started by doing my regular pattern changes. My starting point was a straight size 10, and my usual adjustments includs a forward tilting shoulders adjustment, a lengthening of the torso by 4 cm and the sleeves by 1,5 cm. And the ever present sway back adjustment. After reading the sew-along piece about pattern adjustments for using woven fabric I also adjusted the width of the sleeves to better fit my biceps (sleeve changing methode 1 at the bottom of this blogpost).

 

Camas blouse

Side view

Camas blouse

Front view

Making up as you go along

I don’t know about you guys, but I usually get more ideas about what I want to do as I get further into a project. This time I started to think that maybe the white viscose deserved more than to just be a muslin, and wouldn’t it be nice to jazz it up a little with some contrasting fabric..? When I went through my fabric scraps I found some pieces of gold lace leftover from when I sewed my wedding dress 10 years ago. (Jupp, I have THAT old fabric scraps lying around in my stash). Some of the lace pieces was big enough to use on the front and back yoke of the Camas blouse. To make sure the lace behaved itself I hand basted it to the viscose. That way I could sew the two yoke pieces as one.

After interfacing the pieces that needed it I sewed the blouse together using the instruction booklet that came with the pattern. When it came to assemble the placket I didn’t want to overlock the back placket edge, as I was afraid of extra bulk on my very thin fabric. Instead I sewed two lines of stitching. One on top of the placket edge, like it said to, and one stitch in the ditch next to it. After that I trimmed down the raw edge. I think it looks neat at present, but only time will tell if it still holds up nicely after I have washed it a few times.

Camas blouse

Inside placket

For the sleeve hem I also went down a different path. I cut some cross grain strips of fabric that I attached with the overlock and then topstitched to secure. I’m not quite sure I like this detail though, and are thinking whether I should change it to what it says in the instructions.

Camas blouse

Sleeve hem not as nice as it ought to be.

When it was time for the buttons/ buttonholes I decided to not make regular buttonholes, but rather sew the placket shut, as I have seen many other bloggers have done. The blouse is still more that wide enough to get over your head, and I didn’t feel like the extra work. Besides, when you don’t have actual buttonholes they can’t just pop open when you least want them to. To find perfect buttons I when trough my complete button stash more or less, before deciding to use these cute flower buttons. I bough these at Olianna two years ago when we were shooting “Det store Symesterskapet ” (the Norwegian sewing bee) for NRK in Bergen. They are pink, but somehow they speak to the gold lace and it to them.

Camas blouse

Cute flower buttons

I spent two evenings making the blouse, so I will say it was rather quick. I think most of the job was done after cutting the fabric. I didn’t have too much of the viscose, so I had to be very careful how I used the fabric. And still some of the pattern pieces had to end up on the cross grain. Also, when I started sewing I managed to get two of the placket pieces interfaced on the front, instead of the back. But I figured that only sewists would ever notice, and left it to be as it was. I didn’t have more fabric anyhow, so it would have been difficult to fix it.

Camas blouse

Camas blouse front view

After using the blouse for a few days I’m more and more in love with it. I’m so glad I decided to make it a “proper” garment and not only a muslin. It truly fills a gap in my wardrobe, it’s stylish with a sort of “vintagey” vibe, and it’s ever so comfortable to wear. I do think that it looks best when it’s tucked into a pair of trousers or a high waist skirt, but that shouldn’t be a problem for me. That’s what I like to wear anyway.

Camas blouse

Back view

I’m truly, definitely making more Camas blouses! The next one will probably be in aubergine sand-washed silk – also a fabric that has been in my stash for a while now.

Camas blouse

Camas blouse in action

Camas blouse

And one of the funny photos..

Some of the photos in this blog post isn’t of the best quality. The reason is that they are taken indoors, at night, with very few light sources, and very heavy editing. For this I’m sorry, but it was this, or wait another week…

 

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Anne Lyth

I'm a Norwegian woman in my early thirties, -married and with two children, living in Oslo -the capital of Norway. I have a BA in Art and Design from Høyskolen i Oslo, and is at current working with production in my professional life. Sewing is my all time hobby and passion. 

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