Retro shirt with vintage fabric

Retro shirt with vintage fabric

  Today I want to take a break from the #1year1outfit challenge I’m doing and show you the new shirt I made my husband last week. I have more than a few unblogged garments, but I just couldn’t wait to show you this one. This shirt is somewhat special, as the fabric for it was given to me by our neighbours sister, an 80 year old lady. The fabric is a printed cotton she got from her mother after she died. I have no idea how old the fabric it self is, but it’s a rather thin printed cotton fabric with a nice and soft handfeel. My husband took a liking to the fabric straight away, and asked if I could make him a shirt from it. And of course I could. Pattern trouble I used the same pattern I have used for all his previous shirts. It’s a pattern I drafted for him maybe 8 years ago, and it seems that he has changed a lot in size. Either that, or I have just gotten a lot better at spotting fitting mistakes, because I struggled a lot with the fit across the shoulders and upper arms. In fact it annoyed me so much that I have now purchased the Negroni shirt pattern from Colettes Patterns in the hopes that it will fit better, or at least be a better starting point than my current pattern (This was two days prior to the release of the new Thread Theory shirt pattern, otherwise I might have[…]

Silk dress for a wedding

Silk dress for a wedding

This last weekend I attended my cousin’s wedding at the west coast of Norway. It was a lovely wedding in a beautiful place called Luster, situated at the edge of one of the Norwegian fjords. The bride was a lovely sight in her buttercup yellow wedding dress ( which I made), and her fiansè in his grey suit and yellow tie (one of seven ties also made by me). But, those garments deserves their very own blog post, and I will talk about that another day. Today I want to show you what I was wearing to the wedding: A Butterick B5317 in lavender coloured Thai silk. Fabric for my silk dress The fabric was bought at my favourite silk “dealer” in Norway: Morbaertreet. They have no store, and no website, and are therefore a bit of a trade secret, but they have the loveliest silk you can imagine. I first heard of Morbaertreet when I was still in school, and I remember buying the silk for my own wedding dress there when I got married back in 2008. (Another garment on my blogging list). Butterick B5317 once again. The pattern for the lavender dress I wore this last weekend is my well tried Butterick B5317 pattern (I have three dresses so far), and this time I raised the front neck drop to almost none existent. I was after the boat neck look in front, while keeping the scooped back, and this turned out great. I love the fact that the back neck drop is low, but not[…]

Newsboy cap / sixpence for my husband

Newsboy cap / sixpence for my husband

Hello there. This time I’m going to show you some sewing I did for my husband recently. A newsboy cap in wool and cashmere tweed. I wanted to sew something for my husband in between all the wedding dress sewing, as he needed a pick-me-up here the other day. I knew that a sixpence was on his wishlist – together with a new pair of trousers and some other stuff. This cap is a easy 1-2 hour project, and super for a bit of quick-fix sewing. The newsboy cap pattern I picked up the pattern af Craftsy. It’s a free pattern, and you can find it here. (If you haven’t heard of Craftsy you should go and take a look. I haven’t tried any of their online classes yet, but I have picked up the odd pattern there.) The newsboy cap pattern consist of a top part, a side/front part and a brim. The instructions are easy to understand and with illustrations of most of the steps. And as I said, its free. I made a few changes to the pattern though.  I made the width a bit smaller from approx. middle of the sides and to the front on both the top and side piece, as both my husband and I thought that the whole cap was a little too wide. The brim was also made a bit shorter to give it the shape my husband wanted. In the photo above you can see the shape of the brim is different on the pattern piece lying next to it. That[…]

Det Store Symesterskapet – 5th Episode

Det Store Symesterskapet – 5th Episode

Today the semifinal of Det Store Symesterskapet -5th Episode was aired, and (spoiler alert!) -I’m made it through yet another episode. Can you believe it?  And as always, below you will find my “review” of the episode and the garments I made. First assignment – silk chemise.  This assignment was right up my alley. They gave us sandwashed silk. And not only that, I have actually sewn in this particular silk before, as it comes from Stoff & Stil, and I made a Belcarra blouse with it this spring. Needless to say this gave me an advantage. The pattern for the nightgown/slip was rather straight forward -except for two things: it had to be made in a 45 degree angle to the grain, and the fabric is as evasive as an indian summer nigh. If you breath heavy  around it it will move. I have actually made a list of tips & tricks I use when sewing in silks a short while back, and you can find it here if you are interested.    In order to stabilize the fabric I took a chance and took a piece of plain woven cotton from the fabrics at the back wall and pinned the silk on this. I took my time, to get the grain straight and to smooth out all the creases. The chemise is sewn up with french seams at the center back seam, and a facing at the top front.The back had a elastic casing. The straps are sandwiched between the outer fabric and the facing. When sewing them[…]

Burda 7022 Mens trousers

Burda 7022 Mens trousers

Today I want to show you the Bunda 7022 trousers I made for my man last year. It the brown trousers you could see in the posting about this wool vest last week. The fabric A few years ago (or a little more than that) my mother in law came back from a holiday with a few fabrics for me. One of them was a beautiful wool-cashmere fabric in dark brown. My husband wanted me to make him a pair of trousers with it. It has taken me a while, but they are finally finished. The Burda 7022 pattern He wanted classic suit style pair of trousers. The first pattern I found was the Vogue 2836 mens suit pattern.I started tracing the pattern of the trousers to make the muslin, but got discouraged by all the pattern pieces. I lay the project dead for a while. This was about 6 years ago. 😛 Then last year I found a new pattern that seemed a lot more promising. It was the Burda 7022. It too is a suit style trouser, but a bit more modern. The style has a single pleat in front, a double welt pocket at the backside and two different options for leg width. My man chose option A. The making. This time I managed to stay inspired, and finished the trousers in a week or two. I don’t really have all that much sewing time each day . I made a muslin to check the fit. There were very few adjustments I had to do. The size 48[…]

Wool vest for my husband

Wool vest for my husband

It’s time to show you another make for my husband. I’m so lucky that I have a husband that’s proud of my hobby and all the time comes up with new projects he wants me to make. Lately I love making clothes for him as he usually loves them and they get a lot of wear. Menswear presents other challenges for me, as they often are more classic and rule-bound. (I know Walter), there are exceptions, of course. 😉 This time he wanted me to make him a vest, or waistcoat if you will. The pattern  The pattern is  Burda # 7799, that I bought through Fagert.se -one of the on-line pattern sites I like to order from. The pattern comes with several different views, but my man wanted the classic collar view (a). Taking the measurements and controlling the pattern pieces I decided to go down a size from the recommended, and made the smallest size. Tracing the pattern I discovered that the pattern was without lining -something that’s fine if you make a denim style vest with topstitching, but just won’t do with a classic gentleman’s waistcoat in wool and satin. Making the lining wasn’t really a problem. The backside pieces I could just make in double set, and the front had a front facing. I traced the front piece one extra time and subtracted the shape of the front facing omitting the dart in the process. No need for a dart when it can be “lost” between the front lining and the front[…]