Favourite trousers 2.0, doing wool

Favourite trousers 2.0, doing wool

And here it is. The first blog post in 2016, but focusing on a make from December 2015. Last year was all about selfish sewing for me. The year before that too, come to think of it. Today I want to show you my second try at the pattern made from my RTW trousers that I blogged about back in November. Favourite trousers 2.0 This time I used a dark blue wool twill, that has been in my stash for more than a year. I think I bought it on sale at Rainbow Tekstil in Oslo sometime before last winter. I have already told you about how the pattern came to be here, but I can tell you what changes I did this time around. First of all I needed more space at the waist. If you remember the fly was less than elegantly sewn the last time, showing the zipper teeth at the top. So before sewing up the pattern once again I added a few cm at the waistband and waist  to make sure I had enough space to cover the zipper properly. I also made the rise a little longer at the thigh to eliminate the pulling around the crotch. Even if it worked a bit, I think I will have to add another cm before I’m completely happy with the fit in this area. apparently I have big inner thighs. I also managed to get the grainline on the front pieces level this time, and the centre press line doesn’t twist[…]

Silk dress for a wedding

Silk dress for a wedding

This last weekend I attended my cousin’s wedding at the west coast of Norway. It was a lovely wedding in a beautiful place called Luster, situated at the edge of one of the Norwegian fjords. The bride was a lovely sight in her buttercup yellow wedding dress ( which I made), and her fiansè in his grey suit and yellow tie (one of seven ties also made by me). But, those garments deserves their very own blog post, and I will talk about that another day. Today I want to show you what I was wearing to the wedding: A Butterick B5317 in lavender coloured Thai silk. Fabric for my silk dress The fabric was bought at my favourite silk “dealer” in Norway: Morbaertreet. They have no store, and no website, and are therefore a bit of a trade secret, but they have the loveliest silk you can imagine. I first heard of Morbaertreet when I was still in school, and I remember buying the silk for my own wedding dress there when I got married back in 2008. (Another garment on my blogging list). Butterick B5317 once again. The pattern for the lavender dress I wore this last weekend is my well tried Butterick B5317 pattern (I have three dresses so far), and this time I raised the front neck drop to almost none existent. I was after the boat neck look in front, while keeping the scooped back, and this turned out great. I love the fact that the back neck drop is low, but not[…]

Newsboy cap / sixpence for my husband

Newsboy cap / sixpence for my husband

Hello there. This time I’m going to show you some sewing I did for my husband recently. A newsboy cap in wool and cashmere tweed. I wanted to sew something for my husband in between all the wedding dress sewing, as he needed a pick-me-up here the other day. I knew that a sixpence was on his wishlist – together with a new pair of trousers and some other stuff. This cap is a easy 1-2 hour project, and super for a bit of quick-fix sewing. The newsboy cap pattern I picked up the pattern af Craftsy. It’s a free pattern, and you can find it here. (If you haven’t heard of Craftsy you should go and take a look. I haven’t tried any of their online classes yet, but I have picked up the odd pattern there.) The newsboy cap pattern consist of a top part, a side/front part and a brim. The instructions are easy to understand and with illustrations of most of the steps. And as I said, its free. I made a few changes to the pattern though.  I made the width a bit smaller from approx. middle of the sides and to the front on both the top and side piece, as both my husband and I thought that the whole cap was a little too wide. The brim was also made a bit shorter to give it the shape my husband wanted. In the photo above you can see the shape of the brim is different on the pattern piece lying next to it. That[…]

Easy knit pencil skirt

Easy knit pencil skirt

I know I’m a little later than usual with this blogpost. The reason was that I went on a trip to Copenhagen together with a whole bunch of sewing enthusiast this last weekend. The goal for the trip: The “Alt om Håndarbeide messe” (Arts & Crafts fair) they were holding. But more on that in a later blogpost. Today I want to show you my yellow pencil skirt, as seen together with the Eirajakke in my last posting. The Easy knit pencil skirt pattern: The skirt pattern is the elastic skirt from the book “Gertie sews vintage casual”. It’s called Easy Knit Pencil Skirt. Because my fabric was a plain boiled wool fabric I decided to do something about the model to make it a little more exciting. I cut the front pattern piece in two lengthwise, and made panel seams along the front. In the back I made a kick pleat similar to the one on the Mabel skirt from Colette Patterns. Other than that I just made a slight adjustment at top of center back seam, as I have a sway back. Assembly of the skirt I overlocked/serged all the seams, and then did a elastic topstitch seam on the panel seams and center back seam on my regular sewing machine. Even if these topstitch seams are vertical, I thought it was best to make the seams elastic. I have more than once had to go back and fix seams on garments I have sewn because I didn’t make them elastic enough the first time around. Breaking seams are[…]

Mustard Jenna Cardi

Mustard Jenna Cardi

Hi. Here in Norway the winter has come for sure. Just look at the weather outside my window as I type this. Winter for me means wool. I will wear nothing but wool during the winter season if I can. Today I have a wool cardigan to show you. The pattern: Jenna Cardi from Muse patterns.   Customizing the Jenna Cardi pattern I have made this pattern twice. The second jacket, which is the one I will show you today, is the hip length version with long sleeves (variation A, bottom). To make the cardigan a little less plain I decided to make it with pleated sleeve heads. I searched a while in my patten books and found out how to do it in Metric pattern cutting for women’s wear by Winifred Aldrich. Here is what I did: First I made an horizontal line across the sleeve head above the marks. I then cut the top of the sleeve head into four sections and pulled them up and away from each other. I drew in the new outer line and marked the gaps on the pattern piece. I must admit I forgot about the fact that the pattern already had the seam allowance counted in, so I didn’t make the gaps as big as they should have been. Still, I got some of the effect I was after, and so I’m happy.   I also did my usual pattern changes: lengthening the upper body with 4 cm, and adjusted shoulder seams for forward tilting shoulders.[…]

Det Store Symesterskapet – 5th Episode

Det Store Symesterskapet – 5th Episode

Today the semifinal of Det Store Symesterskapet -5th Episode was aired, and (spoiler alert!) -I’m made it through yet another episode. Can you believe it?  And as always, below you will find my “review” of the episode and the garments I made. First assignment – silk chemise.  This assignment was right up my alley. They gave us sandwashed silk. And not only that, I have actually sewn in this particular silk before, as it comes from Stoff & Stil, and I made a Belcarra blouse with it this spring. Needless to say this gave me an advantage. The pattern for the nightgown/slip was rather straight forward -except for two things: it had to be made in a 45 degree angle to the grain, and the fabric is as evasive as an indian summer nigh. If you breath heavy  around it it will move. I have actually made a list of tips & tricks I use when sewing in silks a short while back, and you can find it here if you are interested.    In order to stabilize the fabric I took a chance and took a piece of plain woven cotton from the fabrics at the back wall and pinned the silk on this. I took my time, to get the grain straight and to smooth out all the creases. The chemise is sewn up with french seams at the center back seam, and a facing at the top front.The back had a elastic casing. The straps are sandwiched between the outer fabric and the facing. When sewing them[…]

Burda 7022 Mens trousers

Burda 7022 Mens trousers

Today I want to show you the Bunda 7022 trousers I made for my man last year. It the brown trousers you could see in the posting about this wool vest last week. The fabric A few years ago (or a little more than that) my mother in law came back from a holiday with a few fabrics for me. One of them was a beautiful wool-cashmere fabric in dark brown. My husband wanted me to make him a pair of trousers with it. It has taken me a while, but they are finally finished. The Burda 7022 pattern He wanted classic suit style pair of trousers. The first pattern I found was the Vogue 2836 mens suit pattern.I started tracing the pattern of the trousers to make the muslin, but got discouraged by all the pattern pieces. I lay the project dead for a while. This was about 6 years ago. 😛 Then last year I found a new pattern that seemed a lot more promising. It was the Burda 7022. It too is a suit style trouser, but a bit more modern. The style has a single pleat in front, a double welt pocket at the backside and two different options for leg width. My man chose option A. The making. This time I managed to stay inspired, and finished the trousers in a week or two. I don’t really have all that much sewing time each day . I made a muslin to check the fit. There were very few adjustments I had to do. The size 48[…]

Det Store Symesterskapet – 4th Episode

Det Store Symesterskapet – 4th Episode

Hi there So, now we have been through yet another episode of Det Store Symesterskapet. 🙂 This time we had to make a men’s vest, redesign a wetsuit into a skirt, and make a childrens party dress. First assignment: Gentleman’s vest.  This was the first mens pattern we were given. Sewing a classic gentleman’s vest is not easy, as well you know if you ever have tried it. The trick to it, as the judges pointed out, is to use understitching everywhere you can get at it. Without any understitching it’s not possible to press the pieces without any of the lining showing, and get that sharp edge you so much want in a garment like this. Lessoned learned there. For my vest I chose a very nice brocade fabric, with a distinct pattern. The low points with the fabric were that it frayed easily, and didn’t press too well. Too much heat – and it would melt.  Just as Willy found out, unfortunately. I was a bit pressed for time at the end, and as a closing I chose a hook and bar solution in brass. It turned out rather cool I think. Kristin won this first assignment – well deserved. Her vest was by far the best one. I came in at a second place, which I was happy with. I sewed a new vest just this last month -for my husband. You can read about it here. Thanks to the lessoned learned at Det Store Symesterskapet this vest turned out really well.[…]

Wool vest for my husband

Wool vest for my husband

It’s time to show you another make for my husband. I’m so lucky that I have a husband that’s proud of my hobby and all the time comes up with new projects he wants me to make. Lately I love making clothes for him as he usually loves them and they get a lot of wear. Menswear presents other challenges for me, as they often are more classic and rule-bound. (I know Walter), there are exceptions, of course. 😉 This time he wanted me to make him a vest, or waistcoat if you will. The pattern  The pattern is  Burda # 7799, that I bought through Fagert.se -one of the on-line pattern sites I like to order from. The pattern comes with several different views, but my man wanted the classic collar view (a). Taking the measurements and controlling the pattern pieces I decided to go down a size from the recommended, and made the smallest size. Tracing the pattern I discovered that the pattern was without lining -something that’s fine if you make a denim style vest with topstitching, but just won’t do with a classic gentleman’s waistcoat in wool and satin. Making the lining wasn’t really a problem. The backside pieces I could just make in double set, and the front had a front facing. I traced the front piece one extra time and subtracted the shape of the front facing omitting the dart in the process. No need for a dart when it can be “lost” between the front lining and the front[…]

My finished biker jacket!

My finished biker jacket!

My finished biker jacket! Finally. I have attached the cuffs and sewed the opening in the lining, and now I’m done. Heres a brief account of some of the troubles I had in making this jacket, in addition to photos of the finished garment of course. The two post I made on the progress you can find here and here.  First times second This is the first time I make a lined jacket, and the second time I’ve sewn any jacket at all. The first time was the velvet jacket I made on Det Store Symesterskapet last week. You can read about that one here, but for now lets focus on the biker jacket at hand. Pattern corrections As I said, -first time I made a fully lined jacket. The pattern I used wasn’t really that good for the task, as it was meant as a thin summer jacket style in raw silk as I told you about in my first “in progress” posting on the project. I used the next largest size (40) when making my toile, and as expected it proved too small. Not always so easy to listen to ones inner self. 😉 Instead of then tracing the the biggest size, as I should have, I decided to go with the size I had already cut out and enlarge it. I made a real hack’n’slash job out of it I’m afraid, and of course then the fit proved to be rather less than desirable once assembled. For one, I made it way too big. Corrections, more corrections I took[…]