Favourite trousers 2.0, doing wool

Favourite trousers 2.0, doing wool

And here it is. The first blog post in 2016, but focusing on a make from December 2015. Last year was all about selfish sewing for me. The year before that too, come to think of it. Today I want to show you my second try at the pattern made from my RTW trousers that I blogged about back in November. Favourite trousers 2.0 This time I used a dark blue wool twill, that has been in my stash for more than a year. I think I bought it on sale at Rainbow Tekstil in Oslo sometime before last winter. I have already told you about how the pattern came to be here, but I can tell you what changes I did this time around. First of all I needed more space at the waist. If you remember the fly was less than elegantly sewn the last time, showing the zipper teeth at the top. So before sewing up the pattern once again I added a few cm at the waistband and waist  to make sure I had enough space to cover the zipper properly. I also made the rise a little longer at the thigh to eliminate the pulling around the crotch. Even if it worked a bit, I think I will have to add another cm before I’m completely happy with the fit in this area. apparently I have big inner thighs. I also managed to get the grainline on the front pieces level this time, and the centre press line doesn’t twist[…]

Easy knit pencil skirt

Easy knit pencil skirt

I know I’m a little later than usual with this blogpost. The reason was that I went on a trip to Copenhagen together with a whole bunch of sewing enthusiast this last weekend. The goal for the trip: The “Alt om Håndarbeide messe” (Arts & Crafts fair) they were holding. But more on that in a later blogpost. Today I want to show you my yellow pencil skirt, as seen together with the Eirajakke in my last posting. The Easy knit pencil skirt pattern: The skirt pattern is the elastic skirt from the book “Gertie sews vintage casual”. It’s called Easy Knit Pencil Skirt. Because my fabric was a plain boiled wool fabric I decided to do something about the model to make it a little more exciting. I cut the front pattern piece in two lengthwise, and made panel seams along the front. In the back I made a kick pleat similar to the one on the Mabel skirt from Colette Patterns. Other than that I just made a slight adjustment at top of center back seam, as I have a sway back. Assembly of the skirt I overlocked/serged all the seams, and then did a elastic topstitch seam on the panel seams and center back seam on my regular sewing machine. Even if these topstitch seams are vertical, I thought it was best to make the seams elastic. I have more than once had to go back and fix seams on garments I have sewn because I didn’t make them elastic enough the first time around. Breaking seams are[…]

Mustard Jenna Cardi

Mustard Jenna Cardi

Hi. Here in Norway the winter has come for sure. Just look at the weather outside my window as I type this. Winter for me means wool. I will wear nothing but wool during the winter season if I can. Today I have a wool cardigan to show you. The pattern: Jenna Cardi from Muse patterns.   Customizing the Jenna Cardi pattern I have made this pattern twice. The second jacket, which is the one I will show you today, is the hip length version with long sleeves (variation A, bottom). To make the cardigan a little less plain I decided to make it with pleated sleeve heads. I searched a while in my patten books and found out how to do it in Metric pattern cutting for women’s wear by Winifred Aldrich. Here is what I did: First I made an horizontal line across the sleeve head above the marks. I then cut the top of the sleeve head into four sections and pulled them up and away from each other. I drew in the new outer line and marked the gaps on the pattern piece. I must admit I forgot about the fact that the pattern already had the seam allowance counted in, so I didn’t make the gaps as big as they should have been. Still, I got some of the effect I was after, and so I’m happy.   I also did my usual pattern changes: lengthening the upper body with 4 cm, and adjusted shoulder seams for forward tilting shoulders.[…]

Butterick B5317 dress

Butterick B5317 dress

Butterick B5317 At the beginning of 2014 I decided to do something about my wardrobe. It was time to throw out a lot of the clothes in my closet and instead focus on having a smaller number of key garments that I could mix and match. I will not tell you here about how the project ended ( if it indeed did. I’m not too sure..), but I want to show off one of the first dresses I made last year. The dress was part of a dresses sew-along in an Norwegian online community called “Sykroken.no” and the pattern I used was Butterick B5317 by Maggy London. The pattern I don’t remember where I bought the pattern any longer, but I think it was from an online pattern store. Butterick B5317 is a dress with a no sleeves/caped sleeves option, and a low cut neck opening for both back and front, an empire waist. The skirt has lots of big pleats that are sewn shut from the empire waistline and down to about the true waist, which gives you a slender waist and a full skirt at the same time. The pattern is labeled Very Easy, which I’m sure is correct as long as you stick to the recommended fabrics. The fabric I used I have a tendency lately to go for more advanced fabrics, but for this dress I didn’t. I used a wool/viscose blend that has a nice body and drape to it. I bought the fabric from Stoff&Stil, but as it has been a year, it’s no longer[…]

Burda 7022 Mens trousers

Burda 7022 Mens trousers

Today I want to show you the Bunda 7022 trousers I made for my man last year. It the brown trousers you could see in the posting about this wool vest last week. The fabric A few years ago (or a little more than that) my mother in law came back from a holiday with a few fabrics for me. One of them was a beautiful wool-cashmere fabric in dark brown. My husband wanted me to make him a pair of trousers with it. It has taken me a while, but they are finally finished. The Burda 7022 pattern He wanted classic suit style pair of trousers. The first pattern I found was the Vogue 2836 mens suit pattern.I started tracing the pattern of the trousers to make the muslin, but got discouraged by all the pattern pieces. I lay the project dead for a while. This was about 6 years ago. 😛 Then last year I found a new pattern that seemed a lot more promising. It was the Burda 7022. It too is a suit style trouser, but a bit more modern. The style has a single pleat in front, a double welt pocket at the backside and two different options for leg width. My man chose option A. The making. This time I managed to stay inspired, and finished the trousers in a week or two. I don’t really have all that much sewing time each day . I made a muslin to check the fit. There were very few adjustments I had to do. The size 48[…]

Wool vest for my husband

Wool vest for my husband

It’s time to show you another make for my husband. I’m so lucky that I have a husband that’s proud of my hobby and all the time comes up with new projects he wants me to make. Lately I love making clothes for him as he usually loves them and they get a lot of wear. Menswear presents other challenges for me, as they often are more classic and rule-bound. (I know Walter), there are exceptions, of course. 😉 This time he wanted me to make him a vest, or waistcoat if you will. The pattern  The pattern is  Burda # 7799, that I bought through Fagert.se -one of the on-line pattern sites I like to order from. The pattern comes with several different views, but my man wanted the classic collar view (a). Taking the measurements and controlling the pattern pieces I decided to go down a size from the recommended, and made the smallest size. Tracing the pattern I discovered that the pattern was without lining -something that’s fine if you make a denim style vest with topstitching, but just won’t do with a classic gentleman’s waistcoat in wool and satin. Making the lining wasn’t really a problem. The backside pieces I could just make in double set, and the front had a front facing. I traced the front piece one extra time and subtracted the shape of the front facing omitting the dart in the process. No need for a dart when it can be “lost” between the front lining and the front[…]

Colette patterns Moneta dress

Colette patterns Moneta dress

Have you seen the stretch fabric dress pattern Colette Patterns released earlier this year? The Moneta dress. I’m not really a big fan of PDF patterns, but somehow I just had to have this pattern. I made a jersey dress with the pattern this summer, and now I have made a winter version that will see me through the cold season. The fabric is a wool/acrylic blend from Rainbow Tekstil with small colour-full dots, almost like slub-yarn. The fabric was somewhat see-through, so I knew from the start that I would have to line it. The lining fabric I chose was a 1×1 rib wool fabric from Janus. I absolutely love the colour -a bright fuchsia colour. However, this two knitted fabrics are quite different when it comes to stretchiness. The main fabric has hardly any stretch to it at all. And the wool rib lining had maybe as much as 20 % stretchability. Oho. Combining stretch fabrics When you want to combine two fabrics with very different stretch abilities there are a few things you’ll have to remember. For one check that what you want to do is at all achievable. Then you will have to cut the most stretchy fabric smaller than the not so stretchy one. Fore me, that meant that I cut the lining approx. 2 sizes smaller than the shell. I decided not to line the sleeves, as that’s a place where see-through-ness  isn’t really a problem. I lined the body and overlocked the sleeves to both layers in one operation.[…]

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Wool Skirt, Butterick B5859

Autumn is here. The temperature, so recently warm and nice has dropped, and there is a crispness to the air, and a promiss of winter coming. What better time to be inside preparing and sewing up warm garments to suite the new season. First skirt up: wool skirt, Butterick B5859. I must admit I really LOVE autumn. – the sunny days where you can see for miles through the clear air, and the beautiful colours that appears all around me. Intense colours of yellow, orange and auburn. I also love the quiet evenings when I can cuddle up in the sofa under a home-made blanket and knit and watch TV. Even the rainy days when the world goes all grey and mystic -those are great for staying inside sewing. -But maybe that’s just me.   Winter wardrobe preparations. The change in season means different things are required of my wardrobe to keep me warm and nice, while still looking sharp. I love wool, and most of my autumn and winter makes are in wool or wool blend. In a wool skirt or dress you still get to show off some legs, and at the same time keep nice and warm. Today I will show you one of my favourite autumn/winter wool skirts. The bell-shaped skirt These are the changes I made:The original pattern for this wool skirt is the Butterick B5859 but I made quite a few changes to this pattern. The original pattern is a knee length bell-shaped skirt in sort of a 1940s style, but[…]